Gamerstail

Core points of Gamers

Gamerstail

Core points of Gamers

What The Hobbit Got Wrong About Azog the Defiler


by peter jackson The Lord of the rings The trilogy is widely considered to be one of the best film adaptations of all time. Of course, there were several changes that Jackson made to the source material. On the one hand, he cut several chapters from the beginning of The Fellowship of the Ring. That left out much of the hobbits’ initial journey, including their interactions with Tom Bombadil and the Barrow-wights. Jackson also cut the “Scouring of the Shire” chapter from the finale of the trilogy.


For the most part, however, the LOTR trilogy stayed true to Tolkien’s material. The Hobbit, on the other hand, played a little more freely with his source material. From Tauriel’s needless love affair with Killi to Sauron as the mastermind of the Battle of the Five Armies, the entire trilogy fell victim to Hollywoodization. The biggest change, however, was in regards to Pale Orc: Azog the Defiler.

RELATED: The Amazing Story Of The Lord Of The Rings And The Hobbit In The Comics


Who was Azog the Defiler in LOTR?

In The Lord of the rings, Azog was an orc from Moria, which was also populated by Durin’s Bane. The exact origins of him were not told, but he became an important part of the story when he slew King Thrór of the Lonely Mountain (who had a ring of power). Thrór had gone to explore the ancient kingdom of Khazad-dûm, but in a bad decision, he took only one companion with him. While there, he and his partner were captured by Azog. The pale orc beheaded and mutilated Thrór. Then he sent the king’s companion back to the Lonely Mountain with a message: Any thief who entered Moria would be killed.

Having slain Thrór, Azog united the orcish tribes of Moria and proclaimed himself king. When the news of Thrór’s death reached the Lonely Mountain, Thráin II (Thrór’s son) was enraged. He assembled an army from the seven dwarf clans and, three years later, he was ready to exact revenge on him. Thus began the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, a six-year conflict that ended with the Battle of Azanulbizar.

In the climactic battle, Azog fought and slew Náin, the king of the Iron Hills, but the pale orc was beheaded by Náin’s son, Dáin Ironfoot II. The Dwarves impaled Azog’s head on a stake, and that ended his reign of terror. The Dwarves had won their victory, but it was at great cost, as many of them had been slain.

RELATED: The Hobbit: How Bilbo And Gollum’s Riddles Were Inspired By Norse Mythology

How The Hobbit changed the character of Azog

Azog the Defiler - The Battle of the Five Armies

Peter Jackson (who may be returning to LOTR) drastically changed Azog’s story for his adaptation of The Hobbit. In Jackson’s version, Azog still killed Thrór, but the timing and circumstances were entirely different. In Tolkien’s continuity, Azog slaying Thrór instigated the War of the Dwarves and Orcs. In Jackson’s version, the war was already taking place, and Azog did not kill Thrór until the climactic Battle of Azanulbizar.

During that battle, Thráin II went mad with grief, so it was Thorin who fought Azog and tried to take revenge on his grandfather. However, he was unable to kill the monster. He cut off Azog’s hand and left him for dead. Years later, Azog returned with a metal prosthesis and vowed to break Durin’s Line by killing Thorin and his nephews. Of course, he didn’t, and Thorn avenged the death of his grandfather at the end of the Battle of the Five Armies.

Ultimately, Peter Jackson’s adaptation needed a more tangible villain. So the writers took the character of Azog and made him fit into the HobbitThorin’s timeline when Thorin’s company of dwarves recaptured the Lonely Mountain with the help of Gandalf. Ultimately though, the whole conflict between Thorin and Azog was a bit contrived and over the top. Still, it was a nice way to add a major conflict. After all, the nemesis plot is something that every good Hollywood movie needs.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.