Gamerstail

Core points of Gamers

Gamerstail

Core points of Gamers

Stan Lee Based a Spider-Man Antagonist on Himself


Spider-Man is known for being Marvel’s most relatable hero, as well as its equally iconic supporting cast and villains. Created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Spidey and even some of his more blue-collar foes embody the more down-to-earth nature of the Marvel Universe. However, something many may not realize is that Spider-Man’s greatest enemy is based on his co-creator.


When creating the character of J. Jonah Jameson, writer Stan Lee drew from himself to create the lovable curmudgeon. This has been endorsed by those who worked at Marvel Comics, which is ironic given the late Stan Lee’s lovable personality. Despite this, Stan Lee’s over-the-top nature and his own sense of heroism definitely reflect on Jameson, who might not be as bad as some fans think.

RELATED: DC Celebrates Stan Lee’s 100th Birthday With Massive Special Release


J. Jonah Jameson is a meaner version of Stan Lee

As mentioned, Stan Lee admitted to J. Jonah Jameson being self-based, although taken to a higher degree. Lee felt that he was grumpy and irascible in his own way and that Jameson was a more exaggerated version of this. The two also share a striking resemblance, with a somewhat younger but still mustachioed Lee looking quite a bit like the screaming Jameson. As different as their personalities may seem, they share an excessive and excessive way of presenting themselves. Stan Lee was the requisite businessman and master of exaggeration, speaking and acting in a way that reinforced whatever it was he was talking about.

The same goes for Jameson, who is known for exaggerating everything he and the Daily Bugle cover, whether the coverage is positive or, in most cases, negative. Of course, the usual target for him is Spider-Man, which is kind of weird given that he’s easily Lee’s most popular and successful character. This may simply be Stan Lee “acting” through the counterfeit equivalent of him, actually behaving in a way that the genuine article would not. Similarly, it could reflect how Lee hated most teenage superheroes before Spider-Man, with Jameson targeting Spider-Man to represent what had been released before in the comics. Plus, starring in your own superhero comic is an exciting idea, especially if you’re the one making fun of said hero.

RELATED: EXCLUSIVE: Stan Lee’s Alliances: Orphans Debuts Characters, Art by Sienkiewicz, Kudranski

Jameson’s understated heroism is a reflection of Stan Lee

Stan Lee Cameo in Ant-Man and the Wasp

J. Jonah Jameson isn’t exactly known for many positive traits, as he’s seen as someone who’ll publish anything for the sake of his glorified tabloid having a story. That’s why the Daily Bugle often publishes negative articles about Spider-Man, even though they’re often unfounded. Stan Lee has sometimes been accused of being a similarly shrewd businessman, particularly in regards to his relationship with other creators of his day. Despite that, both men definitely embody heroic qualities that are rarely appreciated.

With Jameson, the Daily Bugle is known for tackling hard-hitting stories that others wouldn’t, as Jameson himself has a strong moral compass. The character’s hatred of Spider-Man is based in part on his desire for other heroes, such as police officers and firefighters, to receive similar recognition. Likewise, he has been portrayed as a very proud and loving father to his son John, despite his generally gruff nature. Stan Lee was also a freedom fighter in his own way, using comics to tackle political issues at a time when other publishers were content to engage in all sorts of Silver Age nonsense.

This saw him and his colleagues feature various minority heroes at a time when such an act was revolutionary, and it certainly wasn’t just a cheap publicity stunt or stunt. So it’s obvious that Stan Lee shares a somewhat misunderstood legacy with his Marvel Universe counterpart. Although they may share traits that are seemingly inappropriate, they are also unsung heroes in his own way. They both also made a well-known run outside of Spider-Man, though their methods of doing so couldn’t have been more different.



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